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  • Michael Main

t minus one . . .

Notes on surviving the deployment and use of a time machine :





The device itself must be openly visible yet in no way be socially devisive. It should appear in the phenomenal world of matter as an artifact of the most basic utility, instantly recognized and regarded as an essential yet harmless element of existence by all. Even fools will sense its latent power, thus we must expect it will be unconsciously revered- it must be able to be temporarily be able to be shared, even donated to the village in which the time traveler is visiting, yet the machine must still be able to be returned without conflict when the moment manifests for the visitor to move on.

We suggest a common bowl- such bowl being deployed upon spaceship’s landing for eating, drinking, even begging as may be necessary. The bowl should have a powerful, but inexplicable aesthetic quality so as to be desired as an object of quiet wonderment and admiration by the city or village at which the traveler settles.

The bowl may be lent or shared- and yet the borrower’s respect for the beauty and integrity of the object’s aesthetic import will, inevitably, prompt the borrower to return it to the time traveler, and, most curiously, always without malice or envy.


The device’s keypad should be embedded under a layer of metallic gloss across the round surface of the interior of the bowl- wholly invisible to all, even the traveler himself, but whose operation will remain, eternally, as instinctive as is the act of drinking or eating itself.

 

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